Posture: Correct the Exaggerated Arch in Your Lower Back with these Easy Posture Exercises

By Dr Ken Nakamura+

Hyperlordosis Posture-Excessive Low Back Curve: Toronto Downtown Chiropractor

Wouldn’t you like to have good posture? If you want to correct the exaggerated curve in your back, you can do that with exercise.

 

Do you suffer from lower back pain? It’s likely because you have a larger than normal arch in your spine.

 

In this article, I reveal the basic exercises to correct your increased lower back posture. I’ve added some advanced exercises you can do after you’ve mastered the basics.

Posture Correct An Excessive Low Back Curve

Posture: Correct An Excessive Low Back Curve

 

Your lower back and your neck both curve forward, the curve is called a lordosis. It is normal posture to have a lordosis in your neck and lower back.

 

While surfing the net, I’ve noticed a lot of incorrect information out there on posture. Many web sites are giving out the wrong information and it seems like there are many copies of this same wrong information on many other websites.

See Also: 4 Upper Back Exercises To Improve Posture 

 

As a practicing Chiropractor, I’d like to make sure you have correct information as you research posture.

 

When your lordosis has more of a curve than average, it’s called hyperlordosis. Hyper means excessive, as in a hyperactive child. So, the term, hyperlordosis means excessive lordosis in your posture.

 

The picture above shows a woman with hyperlordosis of the lower back, with no lordosis of the neck. “Hypo” means less of or deficient so she is hypolordotic.

 

 

You may have hyperlordotic posture, which is not causing you any pain. That’s great but take measures to correct the problem now. You are at higher risk of developing osteoarthritis in your joints and in the discs of your lower spine.

 

See Also: Advanced Posture Exercises For Your Rounde Upper Back

 

Furthermore, if you take action now, you can make your butt look smaller. I am not actually making your butt smaller. I’m just making your butt look smaller by teaching you the exercises that will put your pelvis in the proper position. The exercises will decrease your lordosis. Same butt – different look.

Hyperlordosis Posture is caused by:

 

A:  Tight muscles

 

  • Your low back muscles run on either side of the spine, they are called the erector spinae.
  • Your hip flexor muscle is called the psoas

 

B:  Weak Muscles:

 

  • Your gluteus maximus muscle gives your butt its shape.
  • Your abdominal muscles. Namely, the rectus abdominus are the six-pack muscles that everyone wants to have. It’s just that for most of us (like me) those muscles are hidden in fat.

 

The problem with the hyperlordosis posture is there is an imbalance between muscles. Some muscles are too tight and pull hard in one direction and others are too weak and don’t pull enough, these imbalances increase the curve in your spine.

 

How Do You Fix Your Posture Then?

 

First, Stretch the Tight Muscles Then Strengthen the Weak Muscles.

A: Arch Your Lower Back Like The Cat Pose in Yoga – Stretch your low back erector spinae (low back muscles).

 

  • Get on all fours with your hands under your shoulders, your knees under your hips.
  • Arch your upper back and lower back like a cat does when it’s scared.
  • Hold for 30 seconds – do 3 sets.
  • If you have a disc problem, or it hurts to arch and flex your back, this exercise is not for you.

A: Child Pose: Second stretch for your low back erector spinae (low back muscles).

  • Get on your hands and knees.
  • Sit back onto your heels with your arms reaching out as far as they will go.
  • Your head is looking down – neck down.
  • Hold for 30 seconds – do 3 sets.

A: Lunge Pose: You need to stretch the hip flexor muscles (psoas muscles)

  • Get down on your knees.
  • Put one leg forward with the knee bent to 90 degrees.
  • Other leg is back with the knee very slightly bent resting on the floor.
  • You should feel the stretch in the front part of your hip.
  • Hold for 30 seconds and do 3 sets.

Second, strengthen your gluteus maximus (your butt shaping muscle) and abs (your rectus abdominis muscles or six pack muscles)

I will give you two exercises to strengthen your gluteus maximus. The squat and the single leg squat.

B:      The Chair Squat To Strengthen Your Gluteus Maximus

How to Improve Posture-Chair Squats: Toronto Chiropractic Clinic

  • Stand with your back to the chair.
  • Your feet should be a shoulder width apart with your feet turned out slightly
  • Make sure to not arch your lower back when lowering yourself down to the chair.
  • Touch the chair and come right back up 10X – do 3 sets.

B:    Single Leg Squat To Improve Your Posture. When you can do three sets of the chair squats easily, try single leg squats. 

  • Always stand near a wall so, you can support yourself if you lose your balance.
  • Stand on one leg.
  • Stick out your butt as much as you can while bringing your other leg back, dragging it on the floor to keep balance.
  • Go as far as you can with the back leg.
  • Don’t let your knee go forward past the big toe
  • Do 3 sets of 10.

Strengthen Your Abs To Help Your Posture

B: Front Planks strengthen your abs without putting dangerous pressure on your discs like crunches and sit-ups do.

  • Lie face down.
  • Toes together and your arms shoulder width apart.
  • Hold this position without raising your butt too high
  • Your body should form a straight line. Look in the mirror.
  • Hold for up to 1 minute at a time. – do the exercise 3 times.

B: Advanced Abs Strengthening To Help Your Posture

Advanced Planks: Correct your excessive low back arch posture

  • Get a basketball or medicine ball.
  • Get in the front plank position.
  • Balance with your forearms on your medicine ball/basketball.
  • Pull your arms in toward you while balancing on the ball.

 

Tell us what you think in the comments below and like us on Facebook. This Toronto Downtown Chiropractor will answer all questions in the comments section. 

 

 

 


Author

Dr Ken Nakamura

Who is Dr. Ken? I’m a father, spouse, chiropractor, and I love what I do! I created Bodi Empowerment to bring you and everyone-else safe and effective methods for self-treatment by basing my articles on research to everything I can. Still many parts will be based on 18 years of experience, seminars, and collaboration with other health experts; which means you will get opinions as well. Sometimes my articles won’t agree with what is currently accepted, but I am not here to please everyone. I’m here to empower you through the knowledge that I give you. Dr. Ken works at Rebalance Sports Medicine in downtown, Toronto.

657 Responses to Posture: Correct the Exaggerated Arch in Your Lower Back with these Easy Posture Exercises
  • Ronnie Romario says:
    July 15, 2017 at 10:26 am

    This article has helped a lot. Really promising workouts.
    Given all these exercises what would be the proper diet doctor?
    Thank you!

    • Dr Ken Nakamura says:
      July 15, 2017 at 8:18 pm

      Thanks for your question Ronnie. Lots of fruit and vegetables, brown rice, and your daily protein. You don’t need too many carbs.

      Hope that helps posture. This is an opinion and not a recommendation.

  • Fiona says:
    July 14, 2017 at 9:13 am

    What a fabulous article . Thank you for sharing this. Can you please provide me some advice for my son who is age 9 and has slightly bandied legs which means he tends to trip and is has trouble with certain sports requiring balance and nimble movement. It is not serious enough for surgery but can you suggest some exercises he could do. We have started skipping to help.
    Thank you

    • Dr Ken Nakamura says:
      July 15, 2017 at 8:26 pm

      Try balancing on one leg first with a chair in front just in case. If he can do that easily bring the leg forward and backwards, keep the chair in front. Move onto moving the leg sideways while balancing on the other leg. Next, hold a one pound weight in one hand while balancing on one leg. Bring the weight forward and backwards. Move on to side motions and eventually moving the weight around the body in a circle while balancing on one leg.

      The above is an opinion and not a recommendation. Hope that helps your son’s posture. If you have any more questions for this downtown chiropractor in Toronto I will do my best to give you a good answer.

  • Marian says:
    July 5, 2017 at 9:46 pm

    Thank you so much for your time and input! I will start the exercises and believe for relief. You are a true blessing to many who are searching for help and answers.

  • Marian says:
    July 4, 2017 at 10:35 pm

    Hello Dr. Ken: I have been told by 2 massage therapists that I have hyperlordosis and one said also kyphosis.
    I used to sit and sleep in a chair that obviously did not have great support as I would slump down into it a lot.
    Well, I ended up with something that feels like it is sticking out and pressing in to other chairs or sofas that I sit on. This is in the center spine area at my waistline or slightly above. If I place my hand behind my back right above that area it alleviates the pressing feeling. Any thoughts or input appreciated.

    • Dr Ken Nakamura says:
      July 5, 2017 at 6:25 am

      Thanks for your question Marian. After 2 massage therapist gave you the opinion that you have hyperlordosis it is more likely †hat you have it and hyperkyphosis also goes along with hyperlordosis. Kyphosis is simply the normal curve usually referring to the mid back. Sometimes it is used to refer to the lower back with no curve or a neck with no curve or a reverse curve.

      Don’t blame yourself. Most times it’s hereditary with your postural habits making thing worse. If bad posture alone caused this, the vast majority of people would have problems.

      I would just do the exercises here assuming that the massage therapists are correct and you are feeling pain. Really there is no need to correct anything if there is just a visual “problem”. I assume you have some pain, soreness or stiffness as you say that things are alleviated when you press above the area.

      The above is an opinion and not a recommendation. Hope that helps your posture. If you have any more questions for this Toronto Downtown chiropractor I will do my very best to give you a good answer.

  • Rosie Dlaw says:
    June 29, 2017 at 12:14 am

    Hello dr. I’m a 31 year old female. I have very obvious hyperlordosis and *I think* an upper rounded back. My back is beginning to really give me problems, as every day I wake up in the morning with back pain. I also have a very stiff neck, and my shoulder blades stick out somewhat. Going to a chiropractor for adjustments helps for about a week, then the pain is back. Any help would be very appreciated.

    • Dr Ken Nakamura says:
      June 29, 2017 at 6:47 pm

      Thanks for your question Rosie. I would start by doing the exercises here in this article. You need to do them for a few months before you start to feel a difference. If you want a faster response perhaps another chiropractor would be helpful. The above is an opinion and not a recommendation. Hope that helps your posture.

      If you have any more questions I would be happy to do my best to give you a good answer.

      • Rosie Dlaw says:
        July 1, 2017 at 4:47 am

        Thanks for the fast reply! Just one more question…. How often do you recommend I do the excerices and stretches?

      • Emily says:
        July 3, 2017 at 7:17 pm

        We have an 11 year old boy and a 9 year old girl. The boy always had normal back curvature. The girl has an overly curved lower back and her belly sticks out significantly. It has been that way since she was very little and we were advised it was normal in certain kids and will correct itself by the time she is 7 to 9 years old. Only, it hasn’t. It actually seemed to have gotten worse. She does not feel any pain in the back, stomach, or anywhere. What should we do? Thanks in advance for your reply.

        • Dr Ken Nakamura says:
          July 4, 2017 at 6:11 am

          Thanks for your question Emily. If you are this concerned you should go to your medical doctor to have an X-ray. Having said that X-rays are usually not recommended for young kids unless absolutely necessary. I don’t think it’s medically necessary but it sounds like you an abundance of fear. Have you done any of the tests in this article? If not read the article.

          Hope that helps your daughter’s posture.

  • Deanne says:
    June 21, 2017 at 4:42 pm

    O stood against the wall as suggested in your arrival. My heels, calves hip and shoulder blades touch. But my head is a long way from the wall I am ashamed to say. My lower back has a massive duo. I will follow your exercises and hope for the best. I can’t get my head near the wall because my shoulder blades protrude so much. Thank you for this article

    • Dr Ken Nakamura says:
      June 22, 2017 at 6:29 pm

      You are welcome, Deanne. Sounds like it will take a while before you see results so be positive and persevere.

  • akhil says:
    June 19, 2017 at 6:47 pm

    Hallo Dr.
    I am a 26 years old male having about169/170 cm hight.recently I found out that Im having lumbar curve and upper spaine curve as wel. And my stomach muscle not at all strong.I am planning to buy some hgh to increase height.is it helps? I read that if I fix my back curve it can b add 1.5 to 2 inch of height is it true? Please guide me
    Regards sir.

    • Dr Ken Nakamura says:
      June 20, 2017 at 6:54 pm

      Thanks for your question Akhil. I didn’t realise that so many people have issues with their height. Almost every single person has curves in the lower back and upper back. If you don’t it’s a problem. I think you mean you have too much of a curve.

      HGH is human growth hormone. First, you cannot grow taller with HGH as your growth plates have fused. Your bones will get thicker but not taller. You can even get some bony deformities. That’s my opinion and not a recommendation.

      Hope that helps your posture that natural way. The only way to apparently be taller is through exercise.

  • gaurav says:
    June 5, 2017 at 5:39 pm

    Sir i am suffering from anterior pelvic tilt ,,please help me to correct this ,,and what exercises and stretches i have to avoid. Please tell sir

    • Dr Ken Nakamura says:
      June 6, 2017 at 9:34 pm

      Thanks for your question Guarav. You need to avoid the exercises that put you in that position such as cobra, sphinx, wheel or about half of yoga postures. I cannot list them all, as long as you understand the idea you will know what to avoid.

      Hope that helps your posture.

  • Luna says:
    June 4, 2017 at 10:33 pm

    Hello Dr. Nakamura
    I am only 18 and have hyperlordosis, and I think it’s pretty severe. I also have kyphosis (the way my thoracic part of the spine compensates with the lumbar lordosis) so it looks really funky. My head is forward from my neck and on the bottom of my neck I can feel one of my cervic vertebrae is very prominent. I have this since I was in elementary school, I have been to a doctor and did quite a lot of excercises that the physical therapist recommended, but they never seemed to work (I recall they included a lot of laying down on my abdomen and stretching out my arms/torso). So I gave up after the unsuccessful excercise journey and now I am getting very self concious about my physique, and I am also having trouble with lower back pain when I walk or stand for longer.
    I also have noticed that I have anterior pelvic tilt and my legs are long and taut (they stretch out diagonally when I try to stand straight).
    I read somewhere that stretches for my m. psoas major are not going to help since my legs are taut and they will only worsen my hyperlordosis.
    Please give me an advice of help me!!

    P.s. what do you think would be the best sleeping position? Mostly I sleep on my side, in a fetal position.
    P.p.s I read somewhere that sleeping on the floor on my back would improve it, since the gravity will try to pull my abdomen down, lol.
    What do you think, Dr Nakamura?

    • Dr Ken Nakamura says:
      June 6, 2017 at 9:46 pm

      Thanks for your question Luna. If you have severe hyperlordosis with hyperkyphosis (increased curvature of the mid back), due to Scheurmann’s disease the problem may not be correctable. There are lots of things written on the various websites by unqualified people. For example, thousands of websites have articles about too much curve in the lower back defined as lordosis. In fact, lordosis is normal to have in the lower back and neck. They are getting even the basic definition wrong.

      If you don’t have Scheumann’s which can be confirmed by X-ray then the exercises will usually help. However, the older you are and the stiffer and degenerated your discs are the fewer effects the exercises will have.

      1. Sleeping in the fetal position for the lower back is fine but will accentuate your mid back curve. Better just to have your legs forward to decrease the curve in your lower back.
      2. Sleeping on the back will usually be too sore or painful as your back is trying to hold that arched position and will make your problem worse. You can even try just to be sure if you don’t believe me. If you had mild hyperlordosis, that is the only time it may help. Certainly not when it is severe. Keep in mind your “severe” maybe what I consider mild so you can only know for sure by trying.

      This is an opinion and not a recommendation. If you have any more questions regarding posture for this downtown Toronto Chiropractor I will do my best to give you a helpful answer.

      Hope that helps your posture.

      • Luna says:
        June 7, 2017 at 6:27 am

        Thank you so much Dr Nakamura, I really appreciate it.
        Is there any way I could send you some pictures, maybe on email? I really need all the help I can get.

  • Kathy Barnes says:
    May 24, 2017 at 12:06 pm

    Thank you for your post. I’m 63 and have a sever case of hollow back and very round upper back. My mother was the same and was in constant pain before she passed away. Will these exercises help me or am I to old?

    • Dr Ken Nakamura says:
      May 25, 2017 at 10:12 pm

      Great question Kathy. The exercises will help but it will certainly take more time as the spine is generally stiffer when you are older.

      Hope that helps your posture.

  • Dean Wilcox says:
    May 17, 2017 at 10:20 am

    I am the opposite I have little to no curve in my lower back causing painfull issues how can I get the correct curvature back? Thankyou

  • vinod kumar says:
    May 15, 2017 at 3:12 pm

    sir,
    i have l5 s1 nerve compression with disc dessication at l5.
    i also have straightening of lumber spine seen(inward curve i can see in the mirror). so what exrecises are good for me ..please reply to correct my lordosis curve .

    • Dr Ken Nakamura says:
      May 17, 2017 at 8:18 am

      You should do the cobra exercises.http://www.bodiempowerment.com/herniated-disc-part-2-the-best-exercises-for-your-herniated-disc/
      That’s my opinion and not a recommendation. Others will give you a different opinion. Remember that like any exercise they can give you pain. You should have them supervised by a health practitioner like a chiropractor or a physiotherapist that knows the exercises. Most medical doctors do not know the exercises. At the least the ones I’ve met in Canada the US and the UK.

      Hope that helps your posture.

  • Veena says:
    May 14, 2017 at 6:26 pm

    Greetings Dr., Iam 43 years old,have lower back pain which I just ingnored, 3 weeks back while brushing I bent forward which caused sudden pain in the back and not ablexciser or stand completely without support I went to Doctor he gave medicine and advice me to take rest for 3 to 4 weeks, MRI reports says :-
    1. Lambarisation of s1 vertebrae
    2. Diffuse bulge with posterior left paracentral protrusion of the L4-L5 intervertebral disc causing mild thecal sac compression
    3. Diffuse bulge of the L5-S1 intervertebral disc with associated liagmentum flavum thickening, causing thecal sac incidenation with bilateral mild foraminal narrowing.
    4 No significant primary canal stenosis seen

    Kindly advive in what needs to be done , best positions,postures and excises to become normally and can I go back to work?when? which involves sitting 7-8 hours in front of the computer .THANK YOU

  • Joey says:
    May 14, 2017 at 1:00 am

    I workout almost everyday and I got the abs and things like that but I have a curve in my back and thanks to these stretches I can feel the muscles getting stronger in my back thank you.

    • Dr Ken Nakamura says:
      May 14, 2017 at 2:15 am

      You are welcome Joey.

      If you have any more questions for this Toronto downtown chiropractor I will do my best to give you a useful answer.

  • Sando says:
    May 8, 2017 at 2:01 am

    Hi, I have just noticed I have a huge dent in my lower spine.
    I always suffer from back pain and often feel like the curve of my spine is digging in to me. Also if I lay on my stomach this also causes pain to my lower spine feeling like it’s really digging in to me and also feel like my back is going to get stuck when bending over or laying on my stomach.

    Does this sound like hyperlodosis?

    Thankyou

    • Dr Ken Nakamura says:
      May 9, 2017 at 9:08 pm

      Thanks for your question Sando. It sure sounds like hyperlordosis. Why don’t you try out the exercises and see how you do after a few months.

      Hope that helps your hyperlordosis. If you have any more questions for this chiropractor in downtown Toronto I will do my best to answer your questions. This is an opinion and not a recommendation.

  • Tammy Pelletier says:
    May 1, 2017 at 7:18 am

    I have a prominent curve in my Lower back it has been there since I was pregnant with twins 26 years now it’s just automatic that I stand with what seems like I’m pushing my stomach out I would like to fix this so I don’t look so funny from the side

    • Dr Ken Nakamura says:
      May 2, 2017 at 5:49 pm

      Thanks for your comment Tammy. Then these should be the perfect exercises for just such a situation. Just try them out. The problem is if you are not doing them properly they might not help. Also, you have to consistent and do them for months before there are any changes. Do them 6 or 7 days a week for months. You may even have to carry on with them 1/day after that.

      Hope that helps your posture.

  • Robin says:
    April 22, 2017 at 12:44 am

    Can I do these exercises daily to correct my lumbar lordosis? Is there any adverse effect, if I try them regular?

    • Dr Ken Nakamura says:
      April 22, 2017 at 10:17 pm

      Thanks for your question Robin. If you have a lumbar lordosis that is normal you should not do them. If you have hyperlordosis you may benefit from doing the exercises. You can have an adverse effect if you don’t have hyperlordosis. If you follow the tests in the article you will know if you have hyperlordosis or not.

      Hope that helps your possible hyperlordosis.

  • Calisthenics says:
    April 20, 2017 at 2:46 pm

    Some really great tips here. I am terrible at sitting slouched at my desk all day and need something to take away this back pain. Do you have any tips on things I can do to sit straight at my desk?

    • Dr Ken Nakamura says:
      April 20, 2017 at 9:07 pm

      I think this article should help you. Hope that helps your slouched posture.

  • Miro Mărgineanu says:
    April 18, 2017 at 2:03 am

    Hey – I just want to ask another thing which for me is very important. How much height can I expect from fixing lordosis? I am 21, 5’8. I know you said a small amount, but that’s relative, because 1 inch for instance, for me, is a lot. Thanks again!

    • Dr Ken Nakamura says:
      April 19, 2017 at 12:12 am

      Thanks for your question Miro. If your hyperlordosis is severe it might be 1 inch. More likely you will get 1/2 inch if you do everything properly and remain diligent and consistent. This is an opinion, not a recommendation.

      Hope that helps your posture.

  • Ryan C says:
    April 17, 2017 at 3:51 am

    how accurate is the back to the wall test for hyperlordosis(I can get up to my wrist in between my back and wall)? I have no chronic back pain but it does get stiff occasionally which seems normal to me. And can you correct this alignment if it is unnatural so to speak?

    • Dr Ken Nakamura says:
      April 19, 2017 at 12:19 am

      Thanks for your question Ryan. You might be altering the results depending on how close your feet are to the wall. Also, the flexibility of your spine has a factor. Really if you want measurements and accuracy you need an X-ray taken from the side. However, most radiologists don’t measure the angle of the curve they simply eyeball it. There are published results that are quote “normal” for men and women in the Journal Spine but like I said you will not likely get a radiologist to measure the angle for you. Nor will they likely know what the results said in the Journal spine. I have never seen any X-ray report where they check the angle of lordosis in the spine.

      Having said that you might be able to find one that will do that for you.

      Hope that clarifies things for your posture. If you have any more questions for this downtown Toronto chiropractor I will do my best to give you a great answer.

  • Amy Windsor says:
    April 16, 2017 at 8:01 am

    Hello, I believe I am suffering from a pretty bad case of lumbar lordosis, and I have been a competitive swimmer for 11 years. COULD swimming affect this? Also, my ribs are very wide. I am a thin person, at the height of 5’8″ and weighing around 125 lbs, but my wide set ribs make me look a bit bigger, and my ribs didn’t used to be wide like this. Could this have been caused by lordosis? And if so, if I fix my lordosis will my ribs become less prominent? Thank you!

    • Dr Ken Nakamura says:
      April 19, 2017 at 12:08 am

      Thanks for your question Amy. Lordosis is the normal curve of your neck or lower back. Hyperlordosis is too much of a curve.
      Answers to your question:
      1. Hyperlordosis cause wide ribs? No hyperlordosis does not cause widening of the ribs.
      2. You can’t change the width of your ribs. Chances are you are noticing them more as you may have lost weight.
      This is an opinion and not a recommendation.
      Hope that helps your hyperlordosis. If you have any more questions for this downtown Toronto chiropractor I will do my best to give you useful answers.

  • Camille - Core Physical Chiropractor says:
    April 12, 2017 at 1:07 am

    These exercises all make great sense for dealing with hyperlordosis. I have a pretty pronounced case of it, and I definitely suffer from lower back tightness and discomfort, but could this be causing my upper back pain as well? I struggle the most with tightness between the shoulder blades.

    • Dr Ken Nakamura says:
      April 14, 2017 at 8:10 am

      Thanks for your question Camille.The best thing for that from my point of view is to do three things.
      1, Improve your posture by using a lumbar support roll while at work.
      2. Always interrupt your posture by getting up every 2 hours or less and walking around.
      3. Using a foam roll on your back. Look at exercise #4. http://www.bodiempowerment.com/advanced-posture-exercises/

      Hope that helps your posture and the tightness / discomfort between your shoulder blades.

  • Miro Mărgineanu says:
    April 11, 2017 at 3:51 pm

    Hello. I have had lumbar lordosis for more than 3 years, I am 21 years old. Do you think I can completely fix this even at this age? Also, by the look of it, the lunge pose and the basketball exercise don’t also increase the curve?

    O, and I want to ask you – after how much time can I expect any knd of results? Does swimming help? If yes, which positions? I sit down a lot, can that slow the process? Will fixing lordosis add height?

    • Dr Ken Nakamura says:
      April 11, 2017 at 10:29 pm

      Thanks for your question Miro. The lunge pose is done without increasing the curve as much as possible. For some that are very flexible it is not possible to stretch the psoas muscle (hip flexor) without some extension. Most people will be able to do it without extension but a significant number of people have to extend to stretch the muscle.

      Remember though that the muscle needs to be stretched in order to change the posture. So for some people they temporarily go into extension but overall they improve their posture after all the stretches are combined along with the strengthening.

      Answers:
      1. How much time? Depends on a 100 factors including your dilengence, how often you do the exercises, doing the exercises properly, your age, how unstable or stable your spine is? So answer can be from a month to years.
      2. Swimming help? No
      3. Sitting won’t make this posture worse
      4. Fixing hyperlordosis, will add a bit of height, that only you will likely notice. People may notice your improved posture though.

      Hope that helps your understanding of your posture. If you have any questions for this chiropractor in downtown Toronto I will do my best to give you a useful answer.

      • Miro Mărgineanu says:
        April 12, 2017 at 12:45 am

        Wow, really didn’t expect this kind of dedicated reply – thanks a lot! The fact that you say it’s possible to be given height from correcting this really pleases me since I do have a problem with my rather short 5’8 stature. Can you offer me an e-mail or some way I can contact you? I really want to come with images and a more detailed discussion about this because I also have done a lot of research about this and have a lot of questions and I really see in you the most dedicated online doctor do talk about this. Thanks a lot!
        PS: Maybe you can’t email me your email address?

        • Dr Ken Nakamura says:
          April 14, 2017 at 8:14 am

          You are welcome, Miro. I don’t give out my email as I am already giving you people a lot of my time. If you really want some help you should contact your local chiropractor to see if they can help you. You can have a proper physical exam this way. Online you cannot be examined.

          Hope that helps your posture.

  • Andres says:
    April 6, 2017 at 9:24 am

    Hi Dr. Nakamura!

    This article has been very useful for me. Thank you very much.

    I have a question tough; any alternative excercise por planks? Any good abs exercise to correct hyperlordosis? I have the idea that I need to strenght the “inner” abs.. and I feel the need to strenght my abs more than with just planks!

    Thank you very much!

    • Dr Ken Nakamura says:
      April 6, 2017 at 11:10 am

      Thanks for your question Andres. You can strengthen the transverse abdominis to help. That’s a line of thinking that some people think are better than just strengthening the abs the regular way. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=p6T2fv2q_yk

      Hope you that helps your posture.

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